< Last Photo   << Last Chapter                Notes on the Geography of Places: Peninsular India: Puri         Next Chapter >>   Next Photo > 
 

Notes on the Geography of Peninsular India: Puri

Puri is the home of the Jagannathat cult, whose annual festival draws tens if not hundreds of thousands of visitors.

Make default image size larger

Peninsular India: Puri picture 1

Translation? Orissa Bridge and Construction Corporation. Why pay attention?

Peninsular India: Puri picture 2

Just thought you should see the approach road.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 3

The main road in Puri is phenomenally wide to accommodate the huge (nearly 50 feet high) temple carts that annually trundle along it. (The English word "juggernaut" is a corruption of the name Jagannathat, or Universal Lord, and refers to the supposedly unstoppable movement of those carts in motion.) Jagannathat, or Universal Lord, is a local god who evolved during the 15th century from earlier forms.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 4

Plenty of cycle rickshaws.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 5

One of the more substantial buildings on the street.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 6

The police kiosk warns against cell phones and leather goods inside the temple.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 7

We just stepped off the main road and through a doorway to this courtyard with a stage at the far end. What is it?

Peninsular India: Puri picture 8

A room to the side reveals all: a school.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 9

English lessons. Or Oriya ones, depending on your perspective.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 10

The temple office, with lots of donations to manage. The tops of the main sanctuary and its accompanying porch are in the distance.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 11

The east or main gate. The temple was established in the 12th century by Anantavarman Chodagaga as a temple of Purushottama, the god later transformed into Jagannathat. The column or ceremonial pillar originally stood before the temple at Konark but was brought here after Muslim invaders defiled that place and caused its abandonment, apparently in the 16th century.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 12

This is as far as we go. Sorry about that.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 13

We can walk around to this side entrance.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 14

Close-up.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 15

Most Orissan temples lack walls, but this one has a strong one, presumably as a defense in former times against Muslims.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 16

The scaffolding gives a vertiginous sense of the tower's height.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 17

Peeping in.

Peninsular India: Puri picture 18

A priest.


www.greatmirror.com Web   
 

* Australia * Austria * Bangladesh * Belgium * Botswana * Brazil * Burma / Myanmar * Cambodia (Angkor) * Canada (B.C.) * China * The Czech Republic * Egypt * Fiji * France * Germany * Ghana * Greece * Hungary * India: Themes * Northern India * Peninsular India * Indonesia * Israel * Italy * Japan * Jerusalem * Jordan * Kenya * Laos * Kosovo * Malawi * Malaysia * Mauritius * Mexico * Morocco * Mozambique * Namibia * The Netherlands * New Zealand * Nigeria * Norway * Oman * Pakistan * The Philippines * Poland * Portugal * Senegal * Singapore * South Africa * Spain * Sri Lanka * Sudan * Syria (Aleppo) * Tanzania * Thailand * Trinidad * Turkey (Istanbul) * Uganda * The U.A.E. (Dubai) * The United Kingdom * The Eastern United States * The Western United States * Oklahoma * Uzbekistan * Vietnam * The West Bank * Yemen * Zambia * Zimbabwe *
go back to previous picture go to next chapter go to next picture go to previous chapter page